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The Global Fund and the 5% Initiative

The Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria

The Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is an international financial institution whose core task is to collect and then to allocate additional resources for the prevention and treatment of AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. This unprecedented partnership between governments, civil society, the private sector and affected communities is part of a novel approach to international funding devoted to health. Working in close conjunction with other bilateral and multilateral organisations, the Global Fund provides its own contribution to the combat against all three diseases. To date, the Global Fund has committed USD22.9 billion in 151 countries for the support of large-scale prevention, treatment and healthcare programmes against the three diseases.

 

10 years of results

Every day, Global Fund investments help save lives

Since its creation in 2002, the Global Fund has made treatment and prevention a reality for millions of people. Rates of HIV transmission have declined significantly in almost every region, including the hardest-hit countries. Mortality rates are also declining now that treatment is available. Mortality due to tuberculosis has fallen by over a third since the 1990s. If this effort is kept up, it will be possible to bring malaria under control as a public health issue in the countries where it is endemic.

 

The finance provided by the Fund has also enabled countries to strengthen their health systems, notably by emphasising the need to improve infrastructure and train service providers and health professionals in many countries.

The Global Fund vision: A world free of the burden of AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria

Global Fund core principles
  • To act as a financial instrument and not as an operator.
  • To obtain and deploy additional financial resources.
  • To support programmes based on countries’ own projects and priorities.
  • To take balanced action based on the region, the disease and the type of intervention.
  • To adopt an integrated and balanced approach to prevention and treatment.
  • To evaluate proposals using an independent process of assessment.
  • To act in a transparent and responsible manner.

The Global Fund in figures

The key figure

The impact of finance from the Global Fund (July 2012): 8.7 million lives saved

The fight against HIV/AIDS:
  • 6.1 million individuals infected by the virus have received antiretroviral treatment (In november 2013 , 4,2 millions at the end of 2012)
  • 6.2 million orphaned children have been cared for and received basic health and education services
  • 1.5 million HIV-positive pregnant women have received treatment to avoid passing the virus on to their babies at birth
  • 3.8 billion condoms have been distributed
The fight against tuberculosis
  •  11,2 million individuals have been diagnosed and received treatment (November 2013)
  • 64,000 individuals have received treatment for multiresistant tuberculosis
The fight against malaria:
  • 360 million impregnated mosquito nets have been distributed (In november 2013 , 270 millions at the end of 2012)
  • 230 million individuals suffering from malaria have received antimalarial treatment

France’s 5% Initiative

Announced in 2010 and launched in 2011, France’s 5% Initiative is a new way for France to contribute to the Global Fund. By mobilising expertise from the French-speaking world at the request by beneficiary countries, the Initiative aims to facilitate the implementation of grants, support the definition of strategies in those countries and promote good grant governance, with an overall focus on capacity-building.

 

Deployed to complement the grants made by the Global Fund, the 5% Initiative is coordinated with the Fund Secretariat. Applications from countries are systematically reviewed and commented upon by Global Fund Secretariat portfolio managers, who are kept informed of how the expert missions are progressing.

 

As a supplement to France’s Global Fund cooperation and monitoring system implemented by the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Development, the 5% Initiative has therefore put specific mechanisms in place to improve coordination of the system. A Letter of Intent was signed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Development and the Global Fund on 20/03/2012 to give concrete expression to the core principles of this indirect contribution by France.

The main coordination arrangements
  • 5% Initiative briefing and discussion meetings in Geneva.
  • Joint 5% Initiative (Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Development, Expertise France) and Global Fund missions in countries assigned priority by the Initiative.
  • Systematic review by the Fund Secretariat of all applications from Initiative countries.
  • Global Fund participation in key Initiative events (seminars, meetings of the Shortlist Committee for Channel 2 projects).
  • Daily contacts and one-off meetings between teams.

 

Madagascar. Thanks to the Global Fund, 4-year-old Célestin is being treated for tuberculosis. The smile is back on his face.<br/> © The Global Fund / Georges Mérillon Madagascar. Thanks to the Global Fund, 4-year-old Célestin is being treated for tuberculosis. The smile is back on his face.
© The Global Fund / Georges Mérillon
A brief history of the creation of the Fund
  • April 2001:
  • At an African summit in Abuja (Nigeria), Kofi Annan, the then Secretary General of the United Nations, called for the creation of a global fund charged with collecting additional resources to fight AIDS.

  • June 2001:
  • the first session of the United Nations General Assembly devoted to AIDS, which closed with a shared commitment to create just such a fund.

  • July 2001:
  • Ratification by the G8 in Genoa of the concept of the fund and of contributions to financing it.

  • January 2002:
  • Creation of the Global Fund at the first meeting of its Board on 28-29 January; formation of a permanent secretariat in Geneva.

  • Nov./Dec. 2002:
  • The first grant agreements are signed with Ghana, Haiti, Sri Lanka and Tanzania.

     

Burmese children in a school for illegal immigrants in Kanchanaburi (Thailand); part of a HIV prevention programme. Illegal immigrants are often excluded from health services and are at greater risk of HIV infection. <br/>© The Global Fund / John Rae Burmese children in a school for illegal immigrants in Kanchanaburi (Thailand); part of a HIV prevention programme. Illegal immigrants are often excluded from health services and are at greater risk of HIV infection.
© The Global Fund / John Rae